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HOW Community Gallery

The importance of this property not only to nature and the animals, but to the community and youth, their education, and their future as well.  HOW appreciates all the support from our neighbors and newly found friends and businesses.

 

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HOW Animals gallery

There are many animals in the HOW property, and  the development of the property  would impact not only their welfare but even the survival of the wide variety of species that call “The Boy Scout Property” home.

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HOW Property Gallery

 

The North Creek Forest is 63.8 acres on the side of Maywood Hill in Bothell, Washington. This second growth, mature forest has nine wetlands and seven streams connecting to North Creek, the Sammamish Slough and the Puget Sound.

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A non-profit group of residents and businesses defending the natural refuge in the heart of Bothell, WA

We are a grassroots environmental organization dedicated to preserving a forest

in Bothell, WA.  The size and completeness of the forest benefits the Puget Sound

ecological system. We are a dedicated group of volunteers attempting to improve

water quality, air quality, and the overall quality of life along North Creek.  We are

dedicated to this effort because increasingly our world is becoming impacted by

over-development.  We believe it is necessary to act responsibly to preserve key

ecosystems in urban and suburban areas to keep the circle of life intact for the

benefit of all.  Welcome to a dedicated group of volunteers attempting to improve

water quality, air quality, and the overall quality of life along North Creek.  We are

dedicated to this effort because increasingly our world is becoming impacted by

over-development.  We believe it is necessary to act responsibly to preserve key

ecosystems in urban and suburban areas to keep the circle of life intact for the

benefit of all.

 

HOW began in the year 2000 when a developer showed interest in the 63.8 acres

known locally as the Boy Scout Property.  Community members organized to educate

and enlighten the surrounding community and government entities to the value of the

hillside forest.  In 2001, HOW conducted a petition to halt master planning of a road that

would essentially cut through the heart of valuable wildlife habitat within the 63.8 acres.  Over the following years, HOW advocated preserving the property in it’s entirety for the future.  In 2004 it was proposed to change the zoning code for two area forests.  HOW organized 300 people to attend a City Council meeting and protest the zoning change.  The zoning for the Boy Scout Property was not changed.  After the success with local zoning, HOW began working toward compiling evidence proving the property’s value in wetlands and habitat.  It had become

apparent that the community would have to go to court to protect the property from

development.  HOW conducted numerous fund raisers during the next few years to

be able to proceed in their efforts.  How incorporated at this time.  In 2006 HOW hired

the well respected wildlife expert, Don Norman to prepare a report about the acreage.  

As fundraising efforts continued through 2007, HOW engaged Keith Fabing, the

wetlands expert to prepare a report on the multiple wetlands and streams within the

63.8 acres.  In 2007, HOW hired Smith & Lowney, Attorneys at Law specializing in

Environmental Law.  In 2008 HOW made the local papers with an “Auction with a

Cause, Environment”.  The large auction helped offset the experts and legal fees.  In

November 2008 the court found inconsistencies in the developer’s plan and the case

ended in inaction.  How began focusing on preserving the property in a proactive

manner.  The economic downturn provided an opportunity to pursue funding for

wetlands and habitat through governmental and granting entities.  In 2009 Don

Norman (Wildlife Expert) did a Functional Assessment Model (FAM).  It was

developed by the watershed company for the City of Bellevue.  The results of the

assessment indicated that the Boy Scout Property is of high value.  Revisions to the

wetlands and wildlife habitat reports are revised annually.  How sought funding from

the City of Bothell, King County, and the State of Washington.  Working with the

City of Bothell, HOW initiated efforts toward securing a substantial Conservation

Futures Fund Grant from King County.  HOW also contracted and secured status

from WIRA 8 (Lake Washington, Cedar, Sammamish Watershed Salmon Recovery

Council) on the 10 year plan.  This is a plan listing the most important areas

designated to protect within the next 10 years.  Both of these milestones were

successful, after a couple of years of hard work, in 2010.  During this time, HOW collected more than 600 signatures in support of preserving the property.

Support for this project included King County Council Members and Bothell City Council Members.  Bothell included natural land and forests on its Capitol Projects list thanks to HOW’s efforts.

 

HOW took part in Salmon release in a stream adjacent to the Boy Scout Property, as well as picketed City Hall for matching funds for the CFT grant.  HOW also assisted with a noxious weed removal project adjacent to the 63.8 acres.  HOW participated in the 2010 annual 4th of July parade in Bothell celebrating successes and educating the public about the ongoing efforts HOW has made and will continue making on the behalf of the North Creek Forest.  HOW is currently reorganizing and pursuing status as a 501C3 organization to continue efforts benefiting those wishing to donate to our cause.

 

HOW Mission Statement:

HOW’s mission is the preservation of the 63.8 acres, 6 land parcels, known as the Boy Scout Assemblage. HOW’s mission includes keeping this acreage in it’s natural state in order to keep this invaluable eco-system intact in perpetuity for now and future generations.

 

HOW Philosophy and Operation Statement:

It is the intent of HOW to always pursue preservation possibilities from governmental bodies and private citizens with a respectful and thoughtful approach. HOW believes the only progress made for a better future is one that is made collaboratively. It is therefore purposed that all members representing HOW shall conduct themselves with an attitude of positive collaboration. The Board of Directors must approve all efforts made on behalf of the organization.

 

HOW Board of Directors:

Sandi Clement – President

Dawn McCravey

Eric Christensen

Valerie Kelly

Renee Huizenga

Dan Paquette

HOW - Help Our Woods